It’s tasteless. It’s pale. It’s versatile. I’ll admit, cauliflower is an odd choice of vegetable to represent but it deserves the spotlight for its work with cheese alone. Cauliflower cheese is an example of perfect food, and as a vegetarian it’s the highlight of a roast dinner (coming in just above yorkie puds). It is not limited to this, however, broccoli’s anemic twin has some more tricks up its sleeve.

Take cauliflower rice, for example. There is a trend towards swapping out carbs for vegetable substitutes (madness, if you ask me), and cauliflower rice is one that makes sense. It’s not slimy like courgetti or oddly hard like boodles, cauliflower rice is fluffy like how rice is supposed to be. It’s also lacking in its own flavor, allowing it to work with any combination. As long as people are scared of real carbs, cauliflower rice will win out against the other fakes.

There’s also cauliflower steak. I will make no attempts to convince anyone of its superiority over beef steak, that’s an uphill battle no one can hope to win. Cauliflower steak does make a great side though. Spice it up and serve it with a curry and you have a healthy side. Maybe also serve this curry with some cauliflower rice, it’s up to you. Perhaps the reason cauliflower is a relatively underrated vegetable is because of a lack of imagination. You can’t really mash it or stick it in a pasta sauce, but there’s more to life than the basics. My final argument for cauliflower comes in the form of a personal anecdote. It was after last year’s Christmas Lemmy, and upon returning to the flat to the leftovers of a Christmas dinner I made the decision to pile cauliflower cheese on a mince pie and go to town on it. It was amazing. As I said, cauliflower requires an imagination.

bookmark me