Billie Eilish takes the all-too familiar role of the misunderstood teen to a whole new level. The whole new level of finally addressing that going through teen-hood is downright confusing. Yet Eilish faces a lot of criticism for this. For wanting to stand out and be seen, for singing about darker themes and for well…trying to be herself?

Are her music videos creepy? Yes, but better than the over-sexualised party-centric dance sequences gracing the Ram TV screens. Is she a loud personality? Yes, and? Is singing about uncovered desires relating to the developing consciousness found in most teens wrong? No. It needs to be spoken about. And bless Billie Eilish for doing so.

Is singing about uncovered desires relating to the developing consciousness found in most teens wrong?

I’ll be honest here, I’m not her number one fan, nor am I as super obsessed with her as the massive crowds that scream out her name when she comes out on stage. But that does not mean I’ll join in on the backlash she faces for being different to your average pop star. Feeding in to the haters just further damages the fragility teens already hold and further stigmatises their state of mind. Yes, some teens don’t always see their privilege, making everything about them and only them. The classic “you really don’t know me, Mum!” is what the confusing time is all about. You can’t learn how not to be self-centered and annoying without going through it yourself. Teens are annoying, but we were all there at some point. Wanting to be heard and understood.

Many fear that Eilish’s alleged “darkness” risks the romanticising of issues such as mental health, that being so dark and broody are the necessary components of depression among teens. Many teens will be dramatic about their misery, claiming to be ‘depressed.’ However, shutting that down inadvertently shuts down the raised conversation about mental health among our youth. We have only just opened the Pandora’s box on attacking the stigma, so why close it again?

Eilish is the product of a desire for self-love, understanding and acceptance

Eilish is the product of a desire for self-love, understanding and acceptance, the core tumultuous journey faced by all broody teens. She has broken the barrier of shiny pop stars and continued the revolution headed by pop queens such as Lorde, Marina and Lana del Rey. She has taken a stand in an industry where shining your own light will always be scrutinised, an especially toxic environment to be in at such a young age. We may not agree with everything she has to say in her songs, or drinks in her music videos, but for her sake, and the sake of current teens, and the teens we have left behind, we must let her creativity flourish. It is such a welcomed fresh presence in a materialistically dependent society.

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