Exeter, Devon UK • Feb 21, 2024 • VOL XII

Exeter, Devon UK • [date-today] • VOL XII
Home News Concerns raised for students during cost of living crisis

Concerns raised for students during cost of living crisis

Concerns are being raised that students could become the “forgotten group” amid the cost-of-living crisis.
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Concerns raised for students during cost of living crisis

Image: CIPHR Connect via Wikimedia Commons

Concerns are being raised that students could become the “forgotten group” amid the cost-of-living crisis.

Such worries arise as a by-product of the double threat of students being both disproportionately harmed by the cost-of-living crisis, as well as disproportionately missed out by the government’s recent economic packages. This also comes as Winter approaches, along with an inevitable increased demand for fuel.

With a perfect storm of the continuing fourteen-year freeze on parental earning thresholds, stagnating student loans, and the increasing imperative on parents to help subsidise their children’s bills, it is becoming increasingly clear that students are not being given the tools needed to combat the cost-of-living crisis by existing government policy or its recent September fiscal statement.

In her previous interview with Exeposé, Exeter’s Guild President Lily Margaroli announced an increase to the Hardship Fund. However, although universities are making clear attempts to aid their students, a stagnation in funding due to the tuition fee freeze has limited the options available to universities and their student associations.

Tax cuts for high-earners will not benefit students

Spokesperson for Universities UK

This has led to fears of increasing strain on the finances of students – particularly postgraduates – with 55 per cent of students concerned about paying their bills and 11 per cent being forced to use food banks after being left with insufficient funds each month after paying rent and bills.

After the September fiscal statement, a spokesperson for Universities UK responded by saying that “tax cuts for high-earners will not benefit students”, urging that the government must respond with “solutions, by working with universities to increase hardship funds and increase maintenance support”.

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