Exeter, Devon UK • May 21, 2024 • VOL XII

Exeter, Devon UK • [date-today] • VOL XII
Home Music Review: Two Door Cinema Club – Lost Songs (Found)

Review: Two Door Cinema Club – Lost Songs (Found)

Charlotte Bend reviews Lost Songs (Found), Two Door Cinema Club's new collection of previously unreleased music.
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Review: Two Door Cinema Club – Lost Songs (Found)

Charlotte Bend reviews Lost Songs (Found), Two Door Cinema Club’s new collection of previously unreleased music.

On 5th June, Two Door Cinema Club announced their latest album: a nostalgic collection of B-sides and unheard work. The Northern Irish band has been a part of the indie-rock scene for over a decade. Yet, with the recent pandemic putting a temporary pause on live shows, the band decided to produce the rather aptly named album, Lost Songs (Found). Although the release was a surprise to most due to the lack of promotion from the band, with the exception of a small teaser on social media, the seven-song collection is a small pick-me-up for fans during lockdown. Featuring an original demo of the band’s popular EP “Something Good Can Work” alongside songs which have never been performed live including “19” and “Impatience is a Virtue”, the band have produced an eclectic new album full of nostalgia for the late-noughties music scene. Whilst the new release is mainly a revival of the band’s 2010 debut Tourist History, for some of these songs it is their first official release even though many have been listening to them for the past ten years at live shows. This is an album both for the fans and the band itself. Forming an album with songs that were mostly written ten years ago but which never quite made the cut must seem rather therapeutic. It is a reminder of the band’s success and the journey that they have been on to get there. Although not all of the songs on this new album are perfect, they were all a part of the creative process and have not been revised, they have been released just the way they were found by the band. 

Although not all of the songs on this new album are perfect, they were all a part of the creative process and have not been revised, they have been released just the way they were found by the band. 

First on the album is a previously unreleased song. “Not In This Town” was previously only heard by those watching the band’s live shows but fortunately the new album has resulted in its official release. This song immediately plunges listeners into the identifiable music of Two Door yet leaves them wanting more. Hopefully this will be high up on the set list when the band are able to tour again!

Next up is the original demo for the band’s first ever single. This very raw version could only have been placed in this album. Even if you’re not a fan of Two Door, you may recognise this one from the film Chalet Girl, The Inbetweeners or even from various television adverts.  “Something Good Can Work”, for many sums up their youth, lifts spirits and immediately makes everyone feel like they are a part of a film set for a late noughties coming of age film. 

“Tiptoes” is the third song, combining the vibes of 80’s synthpop with Vance Joy’s Riptide. The intricate lyrics alongside Sam Halliday’s guitar playing is the sound that every student indie band should be aspiring to replicate. It feels fun, vibrant, fresh and youthful.

Sam Halliday’s guitar playing is the sound that every student indie band should be aspiring to replicate.

The first official release for “19” comes next, opening with the lyrics “Don’t you tell me to follow my dreams I’m only 19”. Whilst the melody and tone remain upbeat and fast, the pace of the lyrics comes across as slightly more angsty in this song. Although less likely to be heard on an indie club night there are definitely more moments for hipster head bopping to the music if that’s your style. 

We are now over half-way into the album and “Hands Off My Cash Monty” is up. Another addition from 2010, this song was unreleased until now but is more well-known than some of the other tracks. Putting across the passion that the band have for music, everything seems to work well together and it generally feels meaningful yet innovative due to the quintessential sound from Two Door. It seems to suggest that the band didn’t want to change even for fame. 

The penultimate song is “Impatience is a Virtue”. The originality of the band really comes across in this song, particularly as it is nearly ten years old. A sense of teenage vibrancy for  living life to the fullest comes across in this music. 

Unfortunately all good things must come to an end so the final song of the album is “Too Much Coffee”, the must have anthem for every road trip that should be protected at all costs. The fading in, overlapping vocals are yet another method used by Two Door. You can’t help but tap your foot to the beat. Another previously unreleased song, it was rarely heard live and occasionally videoed. A smaller number of fans will have heard this song or at the very least taken slightly longer to hear it than most. The rhythm combines “Sleep Alone” and “Eat That Up, It’s Good For You”. A firm future favourite. 

Lost Songs (Found) proves that some positives are coming out of lockdown. Keen fans of the band will be thankful for the final release of some songs whilst others will enjoy a glimpse into the originality and upbeat nature of Two Door Cinema Club. Full of nostalgia and great music, this album has something for everyone.

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