Exeter, Devon UK • May 18, 2024 • VOL XII

Exeter, Devon UK • [date-today] • VOL XII

Five (Not-So-Groundbreaking) Tips to Get You Through Exams

by Abi Crossland-Otter
5 mins read

Forewarning: none of this is groundbreaking; most of this you will have heard before, but in these “times of trouble”, let me be your “Mother Mary”, and speak some “words of wisdom”.

1. Start revising early:

Both within the time leading up to exams and, more specifically, within each day you have to revise. This allows you to pace yourself, and allows time for the inevitable breakdowns along the way. Obviously this is all relative and it depends what works best for you, but I always avoid working in the evenings. I find facing revision a lot easier knowing that if I work hard during the day, I get the evening off to relax.

2. Make a timetable:

If anything, the excessive colour coordinating that this requires is a great method of procrastination that comes without the guilt, because it’s actually revision related! But seriously, a timetable made on Excel for example, is a great way of planning each day, and attributing revision and breaks into half hour slots. Plus, I find ticking off each half hour I’ve accomplished worryingly satisfying.

I find facing revision a lot easier knowing that if I work hard during the day, I get the evening off to relax.

3. Breaks:

Make sure those sacred breaks are wholehearted breaks. But think about mixing them up. Don’t just turn to Netflix or scroll obliviously through Facebook each time. Try things that will allow your mind to continue being stimulated, but in different ways to that of studying. I tend to pick up my guitar for half an hour, squeeze in a yoga session, or seek out my cat for a well-deserved cuddle (yes, my cat is very stimulating, tyvm).

Try things that will allow your mind to continue being stimulated, but in different ways to that of studying.

4. (Getting serious now) Wellbeing:

I have been so impressed with the amount of help I have received from Exeter’s Wellbeing department, and staff in general, in relation to my Anxiety. I urge any of you suffering with Anxiety, Depression, OCD, or anything that means your revision and exam performance may be compromised, to book an appointment to have a chat with someone from Wellbeing, or even just your personal tutor. They are wonderfully understanding and can offer valuable ways of making exams less daunting. From allowing you to sit your exams in a less crowded room, or extending the actual duration of time you are allocated within an exam, to simply sitting down with you and helping you formulate a revision plan, it is definitely worth reaching out if you’re finding the stress or dread of exams at all overwhelming.

If I were to give one piece of advice in relation to maintaining a good wellbeing throughout exam periods, or even within life generally, it would be to treat yourself as you would a child.

5. Self care:

If I were to give one piece of advice in relation to maintaining a good wellbeing throughout exam periods, or even within life generally, it would be to treat yourself as you would a child. Get yourself to bed early; feed yourself nourishing food; be strict with yourself; but also be kind and reward yourself: just take care of yourself.

Good luck!

Exeposé is the University of Exeter’s independent newspaper. Established in 1987.

Freshers

Exhibit

Newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter

Sign Up for Our Newsletter